Gute Leute – Hamburg’s first English language magazine

Sabela Garcia has already featured on this blog. At that time, she was working for a startup and told me how she came to Hamburg.

Now, she is starting a venture of her own – and as a permanent fixture within the startup scene, a Hamburgian with an international background, and a natural-born connector, she had the idea to start a print magazine about the international scene in Hamburg.

Continue reading Gute Leute – Hamburg’s first English language magazine

A warm welcome for refugees makes Hamburg more pleasant for us all.

This blog is about people who choose to come to Hamburg, and most people whom I have spoken to so far have been young professionals, often from within the startup scene. While some people I speak to have difficulty acquiring permission to live within Europe, many others are lucky enough – as I am – to enjoy freedom of movement within the European Economic Area.

In recent months, an increasing number of people have sought to gain access to fortress Europe. Many are fleeing civil wars, such as in Syria, and are seeking sanctuary within our borders.

Now is the time to remember that, however ill-defined the group of “internationals” we talk about is, anyone who comes from a different country is in. This has to be said because it is all to easy to think of the creative class as the designers, developers and creatives who have gone to western universities and cross borders in the priority lane.

Continue reading A warm welcome for refugees makes Hamburg more pleasant for us all.

Germany’s media capital gets a startup accelerator

I’m probably biased, but for me Hamburg is Germany’s undisputed media capital and recent events only confirm that: Twitter Germany recently located its main office from Berlin to Hamburg,  and now DPA (Deutsche Presse Agentur) has chosen Hamburg as the location for its new media startups accelerator.

As reported by Vocer, DPA chose Hamburg because they see more potential for angel investors (Hamburg is one of Germany’s most wealthy cities), and the network of actors within the media scene.

Twitter too cited Hamburg’s strong media scene, proximity to large customers, the presence of advertising agencies and the startup scene as justification for its move to Hamburg.

A bit of historical background: Germany’s largest and most well-known media organisations were founded in Hamburg. These include Axel Springer, Gruner + Jahr, Der Spiegel and Die Zeit. Over 70,000 people are employed in the media industries, with a total of 14,063 companies.

The startup accelerator builds nicely on Hamburg’s rising startup scene. For more information about that, see my interview with Sina and Sanja from Hamburg Startups.